Feb 26, 2024  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
2022-2023 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Division of Sport Health Science


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Department of Nutrition

Programs

Accreditation

The Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics (DPD) and the Dietetic Internship Program (DI) are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND).

The Department of Nutrition boasts a breadth and depth of faculty with combined experience in nutrition areas of functional, community, education, research, clinical, culinary arts, and leadership and a 15:1 student faculty ratio.

 

Image of a kitchen with a stove and sink in the background and a countertop and cooking range in the foreground

 

Technical Standards for Nutrition and Dietetics Students

Life University complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended and the ADAA 2008. These laws provide a framework for qualified individuals with documented disabilities to request reasonable accommodations needed to participate in a program. Reasonable accommodations are defined as adjustments or modifications that enable a qualified individual with a documented disability to participate as fully as possible in an educational program. An adjustment or modification must be reasonable and may not be provided if it would alter essential academic or technical requirements or result in undue financial or administrative burdens.

Qualified candidates with documented disabilities who wish to request accommodations under the American with Disabilities Act or the Rehabilitation Act must follow the University’s procedure for requesting an accommodation. This procedure requires the submission to the Student Success Center of a written request for accommodations, along with supporting documentation from a licensed professional demonstrating the existing of a disability, the functional limitations resulting from the disability, and the need for specific accommodations. Documentation must meet specific Guidelines, which are set forth in the Student Handbook.

Technical Standards Procedures

While inviting and encouraging voluntary self-identification by students with disabilities, Life University has always related to its students as responsible adults with the independent right to make such life decisions. One of those responsibilities is to work with the Student Success Center in requesting reasonable accommodations, academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids and services pursuant to the procedures set forth in this catalog.

Any Undergraduate candidates who self-identify their disability during any of the four stages:

  • Prior to applying for admission,
  • During the application process,
  • After acceptance but before attending classes,
  • While currently attending classes,

Will be referred to the Director of the Student Success Center (SSC).

The Director of the SSC will work in concert with the Disability Advisory Committee (DAC) whenever a question arises as to an individual’s ability to meet the requirements and technical standards of the specific program to which the student is applying, or in which the student is enrolled. The DAC has been established to adjudicate this process in a timely manner. The Director of the SSC ensures compliance with policy.

Technical Standards for a B.S. Degree in Nutrition or Dietetics

The study of nutrition and dietetics involves the integration and application of principles from a broad area of study including food science, nutrition, management, communication, biological, physiological, behavioral, and social sciences. Therefore, individuals receiving a B.S. Degree in Nutrition or Dietetics must meet all academic and clinical course requirements. To matriculate, students seeking a B.S. Degree in Nutrition or Dietetics must have the following abilities and skills to meet the full requirements of the program’s curriculum:

Sensory/Observation: A student must have sufficient sensory capacity to observe and participate in demonstrations and experiments in the basic and applied sciences including, but not limited to, demonstrations on human cadavers, animals, microbiologic cultures and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states. A student must be able to utilize all assessment parameters in order to assess the nutritional status of the clients and implement a nutritional care plan to achieve optimal nutritional status (i.e., obtaining the client’s history, performing physical assessments, anthropometric measurements, and analysis of laboratory data). In addition, a student must have sufficient vision to observe physical changes such as in skin and eye color or changes in other areas of the body.

Communication: A student must be able to communicate effectively with patients and their family members, to elicit information, describe changes in affect, mood, activity, and posture and to perceive nonverbal communications. A student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech, but also reading and writing. The student must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form. A student must have verbal and written communication skills sufficient to conduct patient interviews and record clinical histories, communicate results of diagnostic findings, and make assessments and plans known to patients, their family members, and members of the healthcare team.

A graduate student is expected to analyze, conceptualize, and summarize complex relationships as ascertained from patient records, research studies and other written reports and be able to communicate that information effectively.

Motor/Strength/Coordination: A student must have sufficient dexterity and motor function to elicit information from clients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and to perform diagnostic procedures including, but not limited to obtaining the client’s history, performing physical assessments, anthropometric measurements and analysis of laboratory data.

Conceptual, Integrative and Quantitative Abilities: A student must have sufficient conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities. These abilities include but are not limited to measurement, calculations, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis. Additionally, a student must be able to understand the spatial relationships of the nutritional status, nutrient intake, and any special conditions. Problem solving in group, individual and collaborative settings requires all of these intellectual abilities. Testing and evaluation of these abilities in the Department of Nutrition employ examinations as an essential component of the curriculum. Successful completion of these examinations is required of all candidates as a condition for continued progress through the curriculum. Examples of these assessments include but are not limited to essay, oral and/or extended multiple choice tests, compositions, oral presentations, and lab practicals designed to assess a variety of cognitive and non-cognitive skills in a simulated or supervised clinical settings. All written or word-processed information must be in a comprehensible format.

A student must be able to critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate/interpret psychosocial research and be able to utilize available data to conduct evidence-based studies in the field of nutrition and dietetics.

Behavioral and Social Attributes: A student must possess the emotional health required for utilization of his/her intellectual abilities. Students must be able to exercise good judgment in the prompt completion of all academic and clinical responsibilities. Students must be able to develop mature, sensitive, ethical and effective relationships. Stressors may include but are not limited to environmental, chemical, physical, or psychological. Students must also be able to adapt to change, display poise and flexibility in the face of uncertainties and stressful situations, and to independently demonstrate empathy, integrity, compassion, motivation, and commitment commensurate with the habits and mannerisms of professional training to become a nutritionist or dietitian. Students must portray attributes of professionalism that include but are not limited to honesty, caring, respect, trustworthiness, competence and responsibility to and for their colleagues and patients.

Admitted Students

Upon application to the College of Undergraduate Studies, all candidates are subject to the Technical Standards Policy as presented in this Catalog. During application, all candidates must sign a certifying statement as represented below for placement in their permanent record.

“I hereby certify that I have read, and understand the Technical Standards Policy as listed in the Life University Catalog and am able to perform the essential and fundamental functions and tasks of the Nutrition or Dietetics Bachelor’s degree program with or without a reasonable accommodation.”

Bachelor of Science Degrees

Admission and Transfer Information

  1. All newly accepted nutrition students must attend orientation and advisement.

 

Bachelor of Science Degrees Course Requirements

Degree Requirements

All students receiving a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition or Dietetics must complete a total of 180 credit hours of instruction.

Additional Completion Requirements

  1.  All Nutrition students must attend two mandatory 2-hour sessions that cover the following topics:
    1. Fall of each year: (for Dietetic Majors only, but Nutrition majors may attend)
      1. Applying to internships and computer matching
      2. Managing your professional development
      3. Participation in AND, GAND and lobbying
      4. Dietetics only career opportunities
      5. AND Code of Ethics
    2. Spring of each year: (required for all Nutrition Majors)
      1. Career opportunities for non-RDs
      2. Resume writing and interviewing skills
      3. Ethical issues
      4. Accrediting agencies

Nutrition Majors attending both sessions will receive eight credits toward seminar and will still need to attend four more regularly scheduled sessions during the quarter and give a presentation. Regularly scheduled sessions will be offered three times per quarter.

There will be no make-ups allowed for the mandatory sessions scheduled in the Spring and Fall Quarters. Students must make plans to attend. If students miss a mandatory session, or come late or leave early, students must wait until it is offered the following year to make up the requirement. Attendance will be taken at the end of each session.

  1. Satisfactory completion of all required courses (nutrition and non-nutrition) with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 or above is required for a B.S. in Nutrition.
  2. All courses from areas IV-VI must be completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  3. Satisfactory completion of all required courses (nutrition and non-nutrition), with a minimum overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above is required for a B.S. in Dietetics .
    • If, upon completion, the student’s GPA falls below a 3.0, the student becomes ineligible to graduate from the DPD program. If the student has a GPA below 3.0, he or she can be awarded a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition instead.
    • A minimum GPA of 3.0 or above is required for the verification statement that accompanies the application to Dietetic Internship Programs, however, nearly 80 percent of those accepted into internships have an average GPA above 3.0.
  4. To receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition from Life University, a student must earn at least 25% of coursework at Life University, 30 credit hours of which are to be in Nutrition. Residency is defined as being enrolled (matriculated) as an on-campus student, as a distance learner or via independent study, and has earned the minimum requirements as outlined above.
  5. The DC student who chooses to enter the DPD program must strictly adhere to the DPD program requirements including a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above.
  6. Completion of SLP requirements and documentation on co-curricular transcript.
  7. File a petition to graduate.
  8. Administrative and student reviews of records
    • Registrar Office – Complete a formal academic records review
    • Complete Exit Counseling, if applicable, online at www.StudentAid.gov
    • Student Accounting – rectify any account balance

Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition

The Department of Nutrition at Life University offers the accredited post-baccalaureate Dietetic Internship program and the Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition degree. Students in the Master’s program take 52 credit hours in advanced course work in nutrition, which requires them to analyze concepts of evidence-based practice and research, develop skills in counseling and behavior management, evaluate nutrition issues and community policy, define, and assess management and leadership styles, and compare and contrast the quality of research studies. Opportunities for application of classroom theory and discussion are available each quarter.

Students in the Nutrition graduate program have access to state-of-the-art classrooms, nutrition assessment laboratories, an exceptional teaching kitchen with a culinary demonstration amphitheater as well as growing clinical research facilities. The City of Atlanta also offers a plethora of clinical, community and research opportunities, including being home to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Technical Standards for Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition Students

Upon application to the Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition graduate program, all candidates are subject to the Nutrition Technical Standards policy as presented below in the Graduate Catalog. During application, all candidates must sign a certifying statement as represented below for placement in their permanent record.

“I hereby certify that I have read and understand the Nutrition Department’s Technical Standards Minimum Essential Skills as listed in the Life University Graduate Catalog and am able to perform the essential and fundamental functions and tasks of the Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition degree program with or without a reasonable accommodation.”

The study of nutrition and dietetics involves the integration and application of principles from a broad area of study including food science, nutrition, management, behavioral, communication, biological, physiological, and social sciences. Therefore, individuals receiving a Master’s degree in Clinical Nutrition must complete all academic and clinical course requirements. Students must demonstrate certain minimum essential skills, including but not limited to those listed in the following box, to gain admission and to meet the full requirements of the program’s curriculum.

Technical Standards Minimum Essential Skills —Department of Nutrition

Sensory/Observation:

  1. A student must have sufficient sensory capacity to observe and participate in demonstrations and experiments in the basic and applied sciences including, but not limited to, demonstrations on human cadavers, animals, microbiologic cultures, and microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal and pathologic states.
  2. A student must be able to utilize all assessment parameters to assess the nutritional status of the clients and implement a nutritional care plan to achieve optimal nutritional status (i.e., obtaining the client’s history, performing physical assessments, anthropometric measurements, and analysis of laboratory data).
  3. In addition, a student must have sufficient vision to observe physical changes such as in skin and eye color or changes in other areas of the body.

Communication:

  1. A student must be able to communicate effectively with patients and their family members, to elicit information, describe changes in affect, mood, activity, and posture and to perceive nonverbal communications.
  2. A student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. Communication includes not only speech, but also reading and writing. The student must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form.
  3. A student must have verbal and written communication skills sufficient to conduct patient interviews and record clinical histories, communicate results of diagnostic findings, and make assessments and plans known to patients, their family members, and members of the health care team.
  4. A graduate student is expected to analyze, conceptualize, and summarize complex relationships as ascertained from patient records, research studies and other written reports and be able to communicate that information effectively.

Motor/Strength/Coordination:

  1. A student must have sufficient dexterity and motor function to elicit information from clients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and to perform diagnostic procedures including, but not limited to obtaining the client’s history, performing physical assessments, anthropometric measurements, and analysis of laboratory data.

Intellectual/Conceptual/Integrative/Quantitative Abilities:

  1. A student must have sufficient conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities. These abilities include but are not limited to measurement, calculations, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis.
  2. Additionally, a student must be able to understand the spatial relationships of the nutritional status, nutrient intake, and any special conditions.
  3. Problem solving in group, individual and collaborative settings requires all of these intellectual abilities. Testing and evaluation of these abilities in the Department of Nutrition employ examinations as an essential component of the curriculum. Successful completion of these examinations is required of all candidates as a condition for continued progress through the curriculum. Examples of these assessments include but are not limited to essay, oral and/or extended multiple choice tests, compositions, oral presentations, and lab practicums designed to assess a variety of cognitive and non-cognitive skills in a simulated or supervised clinical settings.
  4. All written or word-processed information must be in a comprehensible format.
  5. A student must be able to critically analyze, synthesize and evaluate/interpret psychosocial research and be able to utilize available data to conduct evidence-based studies in the field of nutrition and dietetics.

Behavioral and Social Attributes:

  1. A student must possess the emotional health required for utilization of his/her intellectual abilities.
  2. Students must be able to exercise good judgment in the prompt completion of all academic and clinical responsibilities.
  3. Students must be able to develop mature, sensitive, ethical and effective relationships. Stressors may include but are not limited to environmental, chemical, physical or psychological.
  4. Students must also be able to adapt to change, display poise and flexibility in the face of uncertainties and stressful situations, and to independently demonstrate empathy, integrity, compassion, motivation, and commitment commensurate with the habits and mannerisms of professional training to become a nutritionist or dietitian.
  5. Students must portray attributes of professionalism that include but are not limited to honesty, caring, respect, trustworthiness, competence and responsibility to and for their colleagues and patients.

Life University complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADAA) of 1990, as amended and the ADAA 2008. These laws provide a framework for qualified individuals with documented disabilities to request reasonable accommodations needed to participate in a program.

Reasonable accommodations are defined as adjustments or modifications that enable a qualified individual with a documented disability to participate as fully as possible in an educational program. An adjustment or modification must be reasonable and may not be provided if it would alter essential academic or technical requirements or result in undue financial or administrative burdens.

Qualified candidates with documented disabilities who wish to request accommodations under the American with Disabilities Act or the Rehabilitation Act must follow the University’s procedure for requesting an accommodation. This procedure requires the submission to the Student Success Center of a written request for accommodations, along with supporting documentation from a licensed professional demonstrating the existence of a disability, the functional limitations resulting from the disability, and the need for specific accommodations. Documentation must meet specific Guidelines, which are set forth in the Student Handbook.

Technical Standards Procedures

While inviting and encouraging voluntary self-identification by students with disabilities, the University has always related to its students as responsible adults with the independent right to make such life decisions. One of those responsibilities is to work with the Student Success Center (SSC) in requesting reasonable accommodations, academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids and services pursuant to the procedures set forth in this catalog.

Any Undergraduate, Master’s-level or Chiropractic candidates who self-identify their disability during any of the four stages:

  1. prior to applying for admission,
  2. during the application process,
  3. after acceptance, but before attending classes, and
  4. while currently attending classes

will be referred to the Director of the Student Success Center.

The Director of the SSC will work in concert with the Disability Advisory Committee (DAC) whenever a question arises as to an individual’s ability to meet the requirements and technical standards of the specific program to which the student is applying, or in which the student is enrolled. The DAC has been established to adjudicate this process in a timely manner. The Director of the Student Success Center ensures compliance with policy.

Department of Exercise Science

Programs

Department of Sport Health Science

Programs

  • Sport Health Science, M.S.  

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