Oct 27, 2021  
2016-2017 Academic Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Student Services



The Life University administration believes that a student’s experience should be challenging, rewarding, transformational and memorable. All students can access the Student Handbook online, which addresses the following topics in more detail.

The Community

Marietta, home of Life University, is a thriving suburban community just 15 minutes from downtown Atlanta. The Metro Atlanta area has a population of more than 5 million and a strong international economy.

Locally, you will find easy access to grocery stores, shopping malls and other basic services. There also is a public bus system that passes near the Life University campus; however, most students find it more convenient to have their own transportation. The area also has high-quality public and private schools.

Atlanta is considered the transportation hub of the southeastern United States. Hartsfield Jackson International Airport is one of the world’s busiest, and the city has extensive local and interstate highways, as well as a rapid transit system.

Excellent employment opportunities for students and their spouses exist. Since Atlanta is a major convention city, many jobs are available in hotels, restaurants and in retail stores throughout the area.

Leisure

The University’s location in Metropolitan Atlanta offers a blend of Old South charm and New South progress. Cultural and recreational opportunities range from the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and world-class museums, theater and symphony, to Six Flags Over Georgia, Georgia Aquarium, World of Coke and professional sports teams including Atlanta Braves baseball, Falcons football, Hawks basketball and Silverbacks soccer. Also, Atlanta hosted the 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Atlanta, the capital of Georgia, is located within easy reach of a variety of outdoor activities. An hour north is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountain Range, where the Appalachian Trail and great camping and hiking are found. Water sports abound on area rivers and lakes. The Atlantic Ocean is a four-hour drive to the east, and the Florida Gulf is a six hour drive to the south.

Living Expenses and Employment

Students seeking part-time employment may locate postings on the Careers4Life posting board which is managed by Career Services. Federal college work-study positions are coordinated through the departments of Financial Aid and Human Resources.

Office of Student Services

Student Involvement

The college experience goes way beyond academics. That’s not to say that academics aren’t important – they are, but immersing yourself in college life means being involved in extracurricular activities.

Recognizing that well-balanced students are infinitely more prepared for life after college, Life University offers opportunities for student involvement, for students to express themselves, contribute to their talents and develop new friendships and relationships both on campus and in the community.

Ian Grassam Treehouse

The Ian Grassam Treehouse, known also as just ‘The Treehouse,’ is located in a century-old home overlooking a small pond. The Ian Grassam Treehouse offers students a gathering place for study, relaxation, fun and University-related activities. It is also a wonderful place to hold meetings, organization events, speakers and social events.

Student Organizations

Life University offers more than 70 various clubs and organizations which you can join. From nutrition clubs and organizations to sports clubs, and from Student Council to chiropractic technique clubs, there is something for everyone. Click Here for a listing of officially recognized clubs and organizations or email involvement@life.edu

Student Activities

The Campus Activities Board (CAB) is hosted out of the Office of Student Services with the expressed purpose of providing entertainment, recreation and educational programs for Life University’s student body. The CAB board is comprised of 6 students part-time Campus Activities Monitors, helps to plan student events on campus.

If you like planning and participating in events designed for students such as concerts, parties, bands/DJs, holiday festivals and dinners, open mic nights, and other fun gatherings, the Campus Activities Board is a great way to get involved and get your friends and colleagues involved as well. For more information email CAB@student.life.edu

Intramural Sports

Intramural Sports are designed to provide an opportunity for all students, faculty and staff to participate in organized recreational activities. Structured leagues and tournaments are offered in a diverse array of sporting activities such as: Flag football, Basketball, Softball, Soccer, Volleyball and much more. It is simple to get involved, register Here and click “create account”.

On the IMleagues site you will find an Intramural Sports manual that is designed to serve as an informative and procedural guide for all sports participants. Team captains are expected to familiarize themselves with and abide by the information contained in this manual. We encourage all participants with questions concerning this manual to contact Student Services Office.

The mission of the Intramural and Recreation Sports Program is to provide students, faculty and staff the opportunity to promote a healthy college experience while building interpersonal and transformational leadership skills.

Recreational Sport Organizations

Club Sports require more commitment than Intramurals, as they involve practices, games and even some travel. To sign up for a RSO or for more information, email reprograms@LIFE.edu.

Student Ambassadors

The Student Ambassadors are an honorary group of students who participate in public relations activities for Life University. We represent the vision of Life University by serving as a liaison to prospective students, leaders in the chiropractic profession, and the community. Our mission is to promote the growth and quality of Life University by optimizing the experience of prospective students and special guests. Events we host and/or participate in are: Club/Market Day, New Student Party, LIFE Leadership Weekend, Campus Tours, Graduation, Leadership Retreats, Lyceum, as well as special events and speakers hosted by the President. For more information, contact Dr. Lisa Rubin in the Student Success Center at LRubin@LIFE.edu.

Student Council

The mission of the LIFE Student Council (LSC) is to represent the entire student body, encourage application of the Eight Core Proficiencies, and promote student involvement. Student Council is always open to any concerns or questions any student may have. Check Blackboard for meeting dates and office hours, or you can email us at studentcouncil@student.LIFE.edu.

Vital Source

Founded in 2007, “The Voice of the Students” is a student-run, student-produced newspaper that exists to serve the LIFE community. Vital Source is a bi-quarterly publication with new issues hitting the stands around 4th and 8th weeks (on the 11-week system). Consisting almost entirely of student writing, Vital Source encourages all students, undergraduate, graduate and chiropractic, to pick up a pen and contribute through the written word. Suggestions, comments, and general inquiries can be emailed to vital.source@LIFE.edu. Please see page 2 of the current issue for information on submitting articles, placing advertisements/classifieds, or purchasing subscriptions.

Class Organizations

Each entering class is encouraged to elect officers annually to manage its affairs, including special projects, fund-raising activities and social events. Each class, upon matriculation, should request a faculty member to act as an advisor.

A Commitment to Minority Participation at Life University

Life University promotes appreciation for cultural diversity among all members of the University’s extended family.

Because of Life University’s desire to share Chiropractic with people from all cultural and ethnic backgrounds, LIFE has actively sought to recruit applicants from the African-American, Latino, Asian American, Pacific Islander and Native-American populations.

Alumni Association

The Life University Alumni Association promotes and serves alumni and the University. The Association creates relevant and meaningful programs to serve students throughout every phase of their education and career, thus fostering lifelong participation and philanthropic support. We will provide a connection for graduates to the University and engage the campus community. Underlying all that we do is a commitment to the vitalistic vision of Life University and the Eight Core Proficiencies upon which a LIFE education centers.

Upon graduation, each student automatically becomes a member of the Alumni Association. The transition from student to alumnus/alumna is observed biannually when the new graduates are welcomed into the Alumni Association.

Please visit http://Alumni.LIFE.edu for more information.

Community Involvement

In keeping with our commitment to Lasting Purpose, Life University encourages student participation in community activities.  Activities such as clothing and food drives, volunteering with local after-school tutoring program, spending time with individuals in a retirement community and working with local community outreach agencies contribute to student growth and development and prepare graduates to be significantly involved as professional members of their chosen communities. If you would like to recommend a service opportunity or ask about existing opportunities for service at Life U, please email WeServe@LIFE.edu.  

LIFE Center for Seniors

As a service to the community, Life University has opened its doors and heart to a new group of students — local area senior citizens, with the LIFE Center for Seniors (LCS).

LCS is a membership program. For a minimal yearly membership fee, persons 50 or older, or those married to someone 50 or older, may join the LCS program. A membership offers seniors personal enrichment through fellowship as well as the use of campus facilities and student rates on chiropractic care.

Career Services

No matter what field of study you choose at Life University, you’ll want to visit our Career Services Office. Career Services can provide you with information on what it takes to succeed in your chosen career. You’ll find out what job search strategies get you noticed and how to create an effective resume or CV. If you need help preparing your resume/CV, getting ready for an interview, or searching for job openings for which you qualify, our trained Career Services staff is ready to help. Whether you are seeking your first job in the field or are looking to advance after you have gained some experience, you can come to us for advice throughout your career. Click Here to visit us online and to learn more about our services and opportunities.

Student Housing

LIFE’s Village Retreat includes a secure 300-bed, state of the art student housing complex with a 600-space parking deck. The apartments are offered furnished and include private bathrooms, washer and dryer, stainless steel appliances, bedrooms wired for high-speed Internet and a convenient location. The Village Retreat features quiet study/gathering areas, a computer lab, lounge and game areas, and an amazing courtyard offering a number of varied environments and experiences.

The Commons at Life University provides affordable housing on campus. Other furnished and unfurnished apartments, condos and houses to rent or buy are available near campus and throughout the surrounding area. The University also provides listings on the availability of nearby apartments, condominiums, houses and mobile homes. Roommate lists are available upon request. Contact the Office of Student Services at 770.426.2700 for housing assistance.

Vaccination Policy

Life University does not require vaccinations for students, faculty or staff as part of application, matriculation or employment at Life University. However, Life University provides all students residing in campus housing with important information regarding meningococcal disease and methods of reducing the risk of the disease.

You can find more information about the State of Georgia’s laws and policies related to immunizations and exemptions at: http://www.nvic.org/Vaccine-Laws/state-vaccine-requirements/georgia.aspx. To learn more about meningitis and vaccine, visit the web sites for the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/faq.html, the American College Health Association, www.acha.org, and the National Meningitis Association, www.nmaus.org.

The United States government may require certain immunizations, inoculations and/or vaccinations as a requirement for residency or student visa status. Individuals seeking residency or student visa status should contact the Department of State for additional information.

Student Success Center (SSC)

We would like to introduce you to the many special services that the SSC can offer you. Our goal is to help promote success throughout your collegiate years and beyond. The Center provides students with learning opportunities that develop skills and competencies to enrich the individual’s educational experiences and assist them to achieve excellence throughout their career path. The Student Success Center at Life University offers academic, emotional and disability support.

Please contact us if we can help provide any of these above services or just stop by to learn more about what the SSC can offer you (or call 770-426-2725). All services are free to currently enrolled Life University students, unless referred to outside resources. The Center is located in the Center for Chiropractic Education building.

The following services are available at the Student Success Center:

Academic Support Services

SSC offers a variety of services to support students in achieving their academic goals. In addition to helping students improve their study skills and develop learning strategies to enhance academic achievement, assistance is also made available through these services:

  • Tutoring
  • Supplemental Instruction (SI)
  • Online Tutoring
  • College of Chiropractic Open Learning Lab
  • Undergraduate Math, Writing, and Science Lab
  • Nutrition Learning Lab
  • Athletic Learning Lab
  • Workshops
  • Make-up Testing

Supplemental Instruction (DC)

Supplemental Instruction (SI) leaders act as facilitators by helping students develop and strengthen study skills and integrate effective learning strategies that are content specific. All students are encouraged to attend as many SI sessions as possible, as it is a voluntary program. Please see SI schedule for specific times and locations. If SI sessions are not available, students will be referred to the appropriate learning lab(s), online tutoring and to contact their faculty for further assistance.

Tutoring (Undergraduate)

Tutors act as facilitators by supporting their peers in strengthening study skills with specific course content. Tutoring sessions are drop-in format. Please see the Tutoring schedule for specific times and locations of the tutoring sessions. If tutoring sessions are not available, students will be referred to the appropriate learning labs, online tutoring and to contact their faculty for further assistance.

Online Tutoring (Undergraduate, Graduate, DC)

Students can access online tutoring through Smarthinking. The link to access the online tutoring is found on Blackboard. Students will need to refer to Smarthinking’s schedule for subject availability and the times they are offered.

Workshops

Workshops are designed to assist students in achieving their academic goals through interactive discussions in reference to developing effective learning strategies, identifying their learning style, improving their time management, goal setting and study skills. Please refer to workshop schedules for dates, times and location. Workshop schedules are also available in the SSC in the CCE Bldg.

Make-Up Testing

Make-Up Testing is available on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday @ 11:00a.m. during weeks 1 through 10. There is no makeup testing on week 3 Tuesday and week 4 Tuesday and Wednesday due to the OSCE testing. There is no make-up testing during week 11 finals. All testing is conducted in room 152 in the CCE building. Make-up request forms are available outside the lobby of the SSC in the CCE building. They must be filled out and signed by a faculty member prior to the exam. No appointment is needed.

Counseling

Life University is committed to the personal growth and life satisfaction of our students. We offer a variety of services and resources for all enrolled students. Our goal in counseling is to provide an environment where students can learn valuable life and coping skills to take proactive steps in improving their overall well-being. SSC Counseling offers a variety of services which cater to the diverse needs of our students.

Life University offers counseling through the Student Assistance Program (SAP). SAP provides 24/7 availability of an off-campus counselor via phone. In addition, students can request face-to-face visits with an off-campus therapist and will be provided with 6 free sessions per year. This service allows students consistent availability including nights, weekends, and/or holidays with a licensed mental health professional outside of the University. In addition, the service can be utilized by students’ dependents which includes spouses and/or children. You can contact SAP directly by calling (770) 951-8021 or 1-800-869-0276. An SSC Counselor can also assist you in making contact with SAP.

Crisis Intervention

A student in crisis should contact Campus Safety at (770) 426-2911 or 911 immediately. Cobb County also has a crisis line at (770) 422-0202. All are available 24/7.

Disability Services

Students with documented disabilities may request reasonable accommodations, which will afford them equal access to all educational programs and activities of the University. Requests for reasonable accommodations must be made to the Student Success Center. The University complies with all state and federal regulations regarding the provision of reasonable accommodations to educational programs and services in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 Rehab Act and the ADAA.

ADA Compliance Statement for Student Accommodations

The Student Success Center (SSC) has been designated to coordinate the University’s overall compliance with the ADA, ADAA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, as they apply to students. The Student Success Center maintains the student’s Self-Identification form and Plan of Action. SSC helps develop strategies for compliance, coordinates the University’s accommodation processes for students and monitors implementation efforts. The SSC also handles inquiries about compliance and investigates complaints relating to student accommodations and service requests. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Dr. Lisa Rubin, Director of Student Success Center and Compliance Officer at 770-426-2725 or LRubin@LIFE.edu, or by contacting the Student Success Center at 770-426-2725 or SSC@LIFE.edu.

Documentation Requirements for Accommodations

A disability is defined as a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. The disability must be clearly documented with information confirming that the student is substantially limited by the impairment and that a need exists for the accommodation.

A student will not automatically be provided with accommodations based on a diagnosis alone. Evidence must be presented that the disability is significantly interfering with the student’s academic performance. Each accommodation is individualized to the particular student, as supported by the student’s documentation.

All students must meet and follow all Life University rules, Student Handbook, Course Catalogs and Technical Standards, with or without approved accommodations. The University will make such modifications to its academic requirements as are necessary to ensure that such requirements do not discriminate, on the basis of disability, against a qualified student with a disability. Academic requirements that the University can demonstrate are essential to the instruction being pursued by such student or to any directly related licensing or accreditation requirement will not be regarded as discriminatory. Please check with the Student Success Center if you are declaring, adding or changing a major or program to determine (a) whether the Student Success Center requires additional documentation or (b) whether other Technical Standards apply to the major or program. **Please review the attached Technical Standards or see the Life University Catalog** Please check with the SSC for the following: (a) If you are declaring a new major or adding or changing a program of study or (b) To determine if documentation is necessary for any updated accommodation requests. Please be aware that Technical Standards may apply to a new program or major.

All students are responsible for providing adequate documentation. Life University is not required to conduct or to pay for any evaluation to document a disability or need for an academic adjustment. Life University does not provide any evaluations or documentation for disabilities. These documentation requirements should be taken to the student’s evaluator and the evaluator is required to make recommendations for academic accommodations in each of the following categories (when applicable): written examinations, technique classes, lab classes/examinations and clinical experience.

Documentation from an outside independent (non-Life University) licensed professional must be provided to the Student Success Center. Students are responsible for all funding to pay for appropriate professional documentation. Your state vocational rehabilitation agency through the Department of Education Web page may be able to assist: http://www.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/resources.html).

Documentation must include the following:

  1. Be provided by a qualified licensed professional with the ability to diagnose the specific disability and must abide by the Conflict of Interest Policy for Disability Services as stated:  Students who request accommodations and provide documentation to the Student Success Center (SSC) must use a qualified licensed professional that is independent of Life University; therefore, the following cannot be utilized: faculty or staff member whether full-time, part-time, adjunct, extension faculty or preceptor. This is to avoid a conflict of interest to the dual role of providing services at the University.  This policy for documentation provided by the licensed professional is for the following but not limited to: 1) the student’s use in helping support whether the request for accommodation under the ADA, Section 504 Rehab Act of 1973 or the ADAA should be granted, 2) the purpose of updating documentation or adding accommodation recommendations and 3) documentation for extenuating circumstances related to Disability Services. There is a formal grievance process available through the Grievance Committee Chair.
  2. If the student is 18 years or older, documentation must be current adult based (18 years or older, post high school). Individualized Education Program (IEP), Section 504 plan and/or a prior history of accommodations are not necessarily sufficient documentation for postsecondary education, since different demands are required and the nature of a disability may have changed due to maturation. (***Note: If you are a Chiropractic student or plan to go into the Chiropractic program, please review National Board of Chiropractic Examiners documentation requirements at www.NBCE.org ***)
  3. Be on professional letterhead with address and telephone number.
  4. Original signature of professional with listed degree and specialty.
  5. Dated.
  6. Assessment data must be included. Comprehensively and clearly define the impact of the disability on the student’s functioning in daily life. Clearly define the limitations imposed and the support data verifying the impact of the condition. Single sub-tests or checklists are not acceptable as a sole source of documented data. Standard or scaled scores from all tests and sub-tests must be included in your diagnostic report.
  7. Recommendations for accommodations must be listed with support diagnostic information. Documentation must be specific in listing practical and written exam based accommodations, if appropriate. ***For Chiropractic Students, please see National Board of Chiropractic Examiners website for further details (“Test Accommodation Guidelines”)***

Process for Requests for Accommodations

The Director of Disability Services or his/her designee will review the documentation and will meet with the student and others, as needed, to determine the appropriate academic adjustment and/or auxiliary aids and services for the student. Students will be notified, in a timely manner, of all specific adjustments or services that have been agreed to and of any denial of requests adjustments or services and the reason(s) for any denial.

If a student requests an accommodation that would modify or eliminate a requirement of the student’s academic course/ program, before a decision is made on whether the accommodation can be provided to the student, the Director of Disability Services or his/her designee will consult with one or more faculty members and/or administrators who teach and/or administer the academic course/program in question and ask how important the requirement in question is to the academic course/program, and whether, why and how, in their professional academic judgment, (a) the requirement in question is essential to the particular academic course/program, (b) changing or waiving the requirement would either lower academic standards or require substantial course/program alteration, (c) the individual student requesting the accommodation has demonstrated a need for the accommodation, (d) there are reasonable alternatives to the requirement that are applicable to the individual student. After conferring with the appropriate faculty members/administrators, the Director of Disability Services or his/her designee will consider the information provided by them and determine, consistent with the recommendations of the faculty members/administrators, whether the requested accommodation should be provided to the student making the request, and if not, whether an appropriate alternative exists that can be offered to the student. The Director of Disability Services or his/her designee will notify the student in writing of his/her determination, including the supporting bases, and that, if the student is dissatisfied with the determination, he/she may file a grievance for consideration by the Grievance Committee, by following the procedures set forth in the Disability Grievance policy.

Disability Grievance Process

(PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SECTION BELOW HAS BEEN REVISED SINCE THE PUBLICATION OF THIS CATALOG. PLEASE VIEW THE Catalog Addenda  PAGE FOR REVISED INFORMATION AND FURTHER DETAILS).

Informal Resolution of a Concern Related to a Disability

A student who is registered with Disability Services and who has a concern of disability-based discrimination or a concern over the denial of an accommodation will discuss that concern with the Director of Disability Services at 770-426-2725. The Director of Disability Services will address that concern with relevant faculty and/or administration and/or the Disability Advisory Committee (DAC) and notify the student of the resolution of his/her concern.

Formal Grievance Process

After exhausting the informal resolution process, any enrolled Life University student that is registered with Disability Services in the Student Success Center may file a formal grievance of disability-based discrimination or denial of accommodations with the Grievance Committee Chair/Vice Provost, who is located in the CCE Building in the Office of the Vice Provost (770-426-2658). A written grievance statement must be made in writing within (10) school days of the action giving rise to the grievance and must be filed with the Grievance Committee Chair on the correct form (which is available from the Grievance Committee Chair, or the SSC). The grievance must describe in detail the action or decision the student alleges is in conflict with his or her rights under the ADA, ADAA or Section 504 of the Rehab Act. A student should also submit other documentation to support his or her grievance. The student will sign a release form stating that he or she understands that his or her disability grievance will be discussed by the members of the Grievance Committee, the staff of the Student Success Center, and/or members of the Disability Advisory Committee in order to allow the Grievance Committee to determine how best to address the grievance. All members of the Grievance Committee will sign confidentiality agreements prior to reviewing any information.

Process for Forwarding Grievance to Grievance Committee

The Grievance Committee Chair will forward the completed written formal grievance forms to the Grievance Committee. The Grievance Committee will review the completed forms as soon as possible but no later than ten (10) school days after it is forwarded from the Grievance Committee Chair to the Grievance Committee. Upon receiving the appropriate information, the Grievance Committee will review all written material and seek additional information pertinent to the grievance. Other involved parties may also be asked to document any action or decision in writing and present it to the Grievance Committee. After reviewing the written material and any other additional information the Grievance Committee deemed pertinent to the grievance, the Grievance Committee will prepare its findings and recommendations concerning the grievance. The Grievance Committee Chair will inform the student in writing of the Grievance Committee’s decision as soon as possible, but no later than ten (10) school days after the Grievance Committee prepares its findings and recommendations. The Grievance Committee may also inform the SSC and/or the DAC of the Grievance Committee’s decision. An appeal of the Grievance Committee’s decision can be made to the Provost for either of the following reasons:

  1. Published process was not followed.
     
  2. New information, not previously available to the Grievance Committee, which may have affected the outcome of the Grievance Committee’s decision, has become available.

Any appeal of the Grievance Committee’s decision must be put in writing and presented to the Provost’s office within ten (10) school days of the student having been notified of the decision of the Grievance Committee. The Provost will inform the student in writing of his decision as soon as possible, but no later than 30 days after he receives the appeal. The Provost may also inform the Grievance Committee, the SSC and/or the DAC of the Provost’s decision. The Provost’s decision on the appeal will be final.

All forms can be obtained by contacting the Grievance Committee Chair or the SSC.

Complaint to Office of Civil Rights (OCR)

A student may file a formal complaint with the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) if the student believes he or she has been denied a reasonable accommodation in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the ADA Amendments Acts of 2008. That office will determine whether a further investigation is warranted.

Information about how to file a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights can be obtained from: OCR Main Line: 202-307-0690, Fax: 202-616-9865, TDD/TTY: 202-307-2027OCR, E-mail: askOCR@ojp.usdoj.gov.

Disability Advisory Committee

The Disability Advisory Committee’s (DAC) primary goal is to assist and support the University in carrying out its policies and procedures for ensuring that students with disabilities who are seeking accommodations are treated fairly and reasonably. The DAC also reviews from students with disabilities who are seeking accommodations to ensure that they comply with the University’s Technical Standards Policy.

The Director of the Student Success Center (SSC) and/or her designee will work with the DAC to apply the University policies and procedures so that the University will provide equal access for any student seeking accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Membership of the DAC will include, but is not limited to the following departmental representatives:

  • Student Success Center or Designee
  • VP of Student Services or Designee
  • Associate Dean of COC or Designee
  • Division Chairs of the College of Chiropractic or Designees (Chiropractic Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Basic Sciences)
  • Clinics or Designee
  • OSCE or Designee
  • Associate Dean of the College of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies or Designee
  • Sports Health Science Department or Designee
  • Nutrition Department or Designee
  • Psychology Department or Designee
  • Financial Aid or Designee
  • Human Resources or Designee
  • Library or Designee
  • Department of Information Technology or Designee
  • Office of Enrollment Services or Designee
  • Physical Plant or Designee
  • Grounds or Designee
  • Appropriate faculty, staff, and/or administrators as needed or their Designees’
  • Off-campus professional (e.g. PhD, MD, etc.)

Student Resources

Health Services

The University provides chiropractic health care for its students and their families. The student clinic is supervised at all times by faculty doctors. Students with health care needs other than chiropractic may obtain an allied health care reference list from the Office of the Student Services. Additional health and dental insurance is an option available to all students.

Bookstore: The Life U Shop

The campus bookstore, the Life U Shop, located within the Socrates Café, is maintained at the University in order to provide students a convenient source for purchasing textbooks, reference materials and other supplies required in the curriculum. All students must provide their own textbooks, laboratory coats, dissection instruments, etc. Contact the Bookstore at 770.426.2686. Shop online at LifeUShop.com.

The Learning Resources Center

The Learning Resources Center consists of more than 200,000 books, periodicals and audio-visual resources for the use of Life University faculty, students and administration. Study rooms, tables and carrels are available to accommodate both individual and group study.

Library services include traditional reference assistance along with individual and group instruction in research methods and the use of library resources. A large collection of online databases is available both in the library and remotely to facilitate the information needs of faculty and students. In addition the library facilities provide computer resources, to students, faculty, staff and the community at large. There are over 60 PC computers in this facility. Students register and log on library PCs with student IDs. LIFE community members will have priority access to PCs over visitors, and visitors will pay for all prints and copies.

Printing, copying and PC access services are available to students. Students can print and copy using their student ID card. Each quarter students will receive 100 free black and white prints or copies in the library.  Printing features include printing to multiple paper sizes, ability to preview print jobs before release for printing, stapling features and hole punch features. Students can also scan to email.

Student Computer Facilities

In addition to the Library’s designated computers for student use, there are two other computer facilities located within the College of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies in which classes are taught using computers or computer assisted instruction programs. There are 60 PC computers within these facilities. Each computer facility supports network laser printers for making hardcopy and data projectors for instruction. All computer centers are connected by a local area network and support email and the Internet. There is access to Blackboard the University’s Course Management System programs, which deliver all university courses on-line from all computers on the campus network. Standard software for all student computers includes MS Office. Instructors may add specialized instructional software required of their students to complete their class work. All computers are protected with virus scan software. Policies and definitions on misuse of computers and/or facilities can be found in the Student Handbook.

Lockers

Clinic Lockers

Students may register for a locker at any time through out the quarter and will be put on the waiting list until one becomes available. Announcements are also posted on the bulletin boards in the student prep areas of Campus C-HOP and C-HOP.

All requests for lockers in CC-HOP must be sent to CCLockers@life.edu from a valid student e-mail account containing the following information: Full Name, Quarter Number, and Life University Student E-mail Address.

All requests for lockers in C-HOP must be sent to CLockers@life.edu from a valid student email account containing the following information: Full Name, Quarter Number, and Life University Student E-mail Address.

Because the lockers are assigned by first come, first serve basis, students must recognize the need for a waiting list. Vacant lockers will be assigned to students on the waiting list in the order by which the locker requests were received. As students are given locker assignments, they will receive notification emails.

Locker violations include failure to accept ownership by deadline, lockers unsecured, empty, items protruding from locker and excessive items which cause the door to bulge. Students are sent notification of violation via email after the third violation the director is also notified and the locker privileges are suspended. The locker is then emptied and reassigned to a student on the waiting list.

The Wellness Center Lockers

The Wellness Center has lockers available for use while you are attending a fitness class or exercising. Please bring your own lock for security reasons and remove all personal items on a daily basis.

Locker rental is available. Rentals will operate on a quarterly basis. All lockers will carry a quarterly rental fee of $15 and $20 for the larger lockers (women’s room only). In order to request a locker rental, please pick up a copy at the Wellness Center or online at www.LIFE.edu under the Wellness Center link.

Life University is not responsible for theft or loss of personal property left in this facility or contained in lockers.

International Student Services

The International Enrollment Specialist, located in the Office of Enrollment Services, provides programs, services and information to international students. The Specialist gives advisement and counseling in the areas of entrance requirements and procedures, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) regulations, travel regulations, employment, financial, personal and cross-cultural issues. The Specialist serves as the official link with USCIS and handles all necessary immigration filing and reporting requirements. The Specialist conducts international student orientations and seminars on relevant issues. Contact the International Enrollment Specialist at 770-426-2703 or toll free at 800-543-3202. For more information on international student rules, regulations, and procedures visit Academic Policies & Information 

Student Advocacy Center

The Office of Student Advocacy and Advising provides resources to Life University students during their first year and beyond. Located in the Learning Resource Center Building, this office coordinates a variety of programs and services, including:

  • Academic advising for first-year and transfer students
     
  • Assistance with completing financial aid, registrar and student accounting forms
     
  • Facilitating financial aid counseling and making adjustments to your financial aid package
     
  • Answering questions about your student account
     
  • Advising resources for all students, to include adding and dropping courses as well as changing your major
     
  • Advising and providing resources for students who plan to apply to professional or graduate schools
     
  • Professional advisors aiding students in exploring the various academic majors and concentrations offered at Life University
     
  • Facilitating FYE 101 , FYE 103  and FYEX 1101  courses designed specifically to assist new students in transitioning to college life and professional studies, and to life at Life University in particular

The purpose of this Center is to cultivate the academic success of all students, with an emphasis on first-year undergraduate, graduate and professional students. The Office of Student Advocacy and Advisement augments academic advising for all students through the coordination of academic advising for first-year students; communicating regularly with second-year students and beyond to encourage student success; managing student academic interventions; providing advisement for transfer students and for students interested in preparing for and applying to professional and graduate schools; providing training and serving as a resource for faculty advisors; as well as supporting the Registrar, Financial Aid and Student Accounting Departments.

Contact Our Office: Student Advocacy Center—Located in the Learning Resource Center Building 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Monday–Friday Phone: (770) 426-2667 ext. 4.

Advisement At LIFE

Advising is an educational process that facilitates students’ understanding of the meaning and purpose of higher education. It fosters intellectual and personal development toward academic success and lifelong learning. In alignment with the mission statement of Life University, the advisement resources on campus are dedicated to creating an atmosphere in which students are empowered to pursue, and make meaning of, a Life University education and the skills and values needed for career success and personal fulfillment.

PASS Advisors

The Student Advocacy Center plays a large role in students’ holistic experiences at Life University. The Director of Student Advocacy and Advisement and team of PASS advisors work closely with many offices around campus to ensure that student needs are met and questions are answered. The PASS advisors make contact with students after acceptance by the enrollment management team and discuss orientation and class schedules for the students’ first quarter. They also work with students to ensure needs are met with financial aid paperwork and housing arrangements.

After orientation, members of the PASS advising team teach the First Year Experience (FYE), helping students further orient to the LIFE campus and culture. Topics covered include LIFE library resources, university policies, academic advising and planning, motivation, financial health, academic skills (learning styles, time management, and study skills), various assessments to engage students in discussions about these topics, and presentations by a variety of campus offices and resources. These topics in FYE include all six elements of health of the wellness portfolio on campus (physical, emotional, social, intellectual, spiritual and environmental), providing students with resources and tools to become knowledgeable and resourceful students and citizens.

Students visit their PASS advisor at least once per quarter to discuss registration and course selection for the upcoming quarter and are invited to visit as often as needed to discuss any concerns, questions or just good news. PASS advisors focus largely on the student as a whole, meaning they are invested in helping each student grow in all areas of wellness, not just academics. At the completion of two quarters of work in the College of Chiropractic or three quarters in the College of Graduate and Undergraduate Studies, students are transitioned to faculty advisors for the remainder of their academic career at Life University. At that point, PASS advisors become advocates more than advisors for these students – students can come see them, but the PASS advisor will also direct them to appropriate resources outside their office, including the faculty advisor if necessary.

Advisement Process

All students, regardless of their college or degree program, have an opportunity to be advised through the Progressive Advising for Student Success (PASS) Center. Incoming students will be notified prior to Orientation about any advising and registration appointments they may have or need to make with their assigned attendance. At that time, faculty advisors and PASS advisors work together to create a seamless transition to faculty advising for students progressing through their academic programs toward graduation. Graduate students are assigned a faculty advisor at the beginning of their academic program and meet with that advisor on a regular basis, yet still have full access to PASS advisors as needed.

Advisement Learning Outcomes

Through the advising experience at Life University, which includes individual advising as well as the First Year Experience course, students will:

Demonstrate the ability to make, and follow through with, healthy, effective decisions concerning their educational, career and personal wellness goals; develop an educational plan for successfully achieving their goals; and select courses each quarter to progress toward those goals.

Demonstrate an understanding of the value of the Life University degree through the value of the general education requirements, major/minor requirements, graduate programs and professional programs.

Utilize the resources and services on campus to assist them in achieving their academic, career and personal wellness goals. Make use of referrals to campus resources as needed. Effectively utilize a degree audit through the use of the WebAdvisor report in their educational planning graduate in a timely manner based on their educational plans.

Advisement

Advising Mission Statement

In alignment with the mission statement of Life University, the advisement resources on campus are dedicated to creating an atmosphere in which students are empowered to pursue, and make meaning of, a Life University education and the skills and values needed for career success and personal fulfillment. Advisement resources include the Progressive Advisement for Student Success (PASS) advisors as well as faculty advisors in each college.

Advising assists students in:

  • evaluating progress toward the realization of academic goals,
     
  • evaluating progress toward the realization of career and personal wellness goals,
     
  • making decisions based on accurate information,
     
  • comprehending institutional policies and procedures and
     
  • understanding institutional support services available to them.

Reasons for Visiting An Advisor

At Life University, advising provides students with the opportunity to build interpersonal relationships with their advisor for the purpose of gaining assistance in planning their educational career, in learning the skills needed for academic success and in learning how to access the personal wellness resources and services that are available to them on the LIFE campus. Below are some additional reasons students may want to meet with their advisor:

  • Letters of Recommendation
     
  • Sharing Good News
     
  • To Find Resources
     
  • Research Opportunities
     
  • Holistic Advisement
     
  • Course Selection or Changes
     
  • Registration

Expectations for the Advisor/Advisee Relationship is a collaborative educational process whereby students and their advisors are partners in meeting and ensuring academic, career and personal wellness goals. This partnership requires proactive participation and involvement by both parties. This partnership is a process that is built over the student’s entire educational career at Life University. Both parties have clear responsibilities for ensuring that this partnership is successful.

Life University Honor Code

Our Commitment to Integrity

The Expectation Continuum: Tolerance, Respect and Honor

Life University embraces a central role for integrity in its pursuit of its Mission. LIFE recognizes that its approach to integrity covers an increasingly responsive continuum in approaches.

At one end of the spectrum, LIFE recognizes the highest ideals of integrity. We understand how each person’s commitment to integrity honors and elevates the entire community. That our approach to issues of integrity are grounded in the highest and noblest aspirations of human beings: to honor and defend the commitments of ourselves and others, to act honorably, to be honest, responsible, worthy of trust and act with the highest levels of responsibility. We see the exemplars of this approach throughout our country’s history: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Thurgood Marshall and Martin Luther King, Jr.

On the other end of the integrity spectrum, Life University recognizes and understands that it is necessary to ground those high ideals into a well-codified and structured set of rules for its members to follow. These rules provide the barest minimum level of integrity that the community will tolerate. Anyone failing to behave at or above these minimums must face processes designed to improve their behavior to a higher level in order to continue their membership in the LIFE community.

In between these two levels is the state in which the vast majority of the members of the LIFE community exist. Life University embraces the notion that integrity is not a state, rather that it is a daily striving, a struggle to reach closer to the highest ideals despite pressures to retreat to the lower levels that result in complaints, investigations, hearings and sanctions. This results in a community based on mutual respect.

Life University understands and embraces the centrality of the students’ experience to learn more than academic content, but also to develop skills and values that will support them in managing their approach to integrity their whole life. To this end, LIFE charged a special task force in 2005 to develop this Guide to Academic Integrity and the accompanying program. Life University’s leadership is committed to support, in any way possible, the manifestation of integrity on the campus, in its myriad of forms and many levels of manifestation.

LIFE recognizes five essential components to integrity on campus and expects faculty members, staff and students to embrace these concepts and to live them on a daily basis, on and off campus:

Responsibility

Along with the rights of being a member of the LIFE academic community comes the principle of responsibility. Every member of the LIFE community is charged with accountability for upholding the institution’s core values and expectations. Every member of the LIFE community is expected to exemplify the University’s standards and practices.

Respect

At the core of the LIFE community lies a deep regard for other human beings. Faculty members and students respect each other as people, not as a means to an end. Faculty members show respect by valuing students’ goals and ideas, by engaging students and each other with intellectual rigor and discipline, providing honest feedback on students’ and peers’ work with a view to improvement and by treating every member of the LIFE community as a valued individual.

Honesty

Honesty is the cornerstone of the academic enterprise. At LIFE, our educational focus is on the Eight Core Proficiencies. Intellectual and personal honesty is the hallmark of Life University’s endeavors to advance truth and to explore deeper understanding of human health and behavior. In creating the next generation of graduates to initiate needed change in society, LIFE recognizes the centrality of both honesty and candor.

Trust

Life University’s policies and practices are based upon a fundamental recognition among its members that at the core of each and every human being is an innate intelligence that shares common origin. This understanding creates an awareness among LIFE community members of its common mission—to improve the world by applying intellects and energy in positive directions. This understanding provides the foundation for a fundamental expectation of positive and supportive behavior from other members of the LIFE community.

Fairness

Life University provides fair evaluation processes for all members of the LIFE community. It is an important value at LIFE to have processes spelled out clearly and administered equitably across the organization.

Personal and Academic Integrity at Life University

The first of the Eight Core Proficiencies at Life University is Integrity and Citizenship. The following documents will help explain the University’s expectations for personal and academic integrity.

These documents are the Life University Honor Code, the Standards of Conduct, processes involved in administering the Honor Code and Standards of Conduct, as well as a flow chart and the necessary forms required to navigate through the process in the event a violation has been alleged.

Please take the time to familiarize yourself with the content and processes contained within this document.

Life University Honor Code

Students

All members of the Life University community are entrusted with the responsibility of upholding ethical goals and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of Life University is a personal commitment to the principles of citizenship and integrity.

Integrity provides the underpinning for the responsible exercise of our rights and responsibilities as civil human beings within our community. Integrity leads to empowerment and excellence, while a lack of integrity results in mediocrity. Life University teaches students how to achieve and maintain personal integrity and function as valued citizens within the academic, health care and larger communities.

As individuals and members of the Life University community, we commit ourselves to act with civility, honesty, responsibility and — above all — integrity and honor. We are accountable for all that we say, write and do. We are responsible for the academic integrity of our work. We pledge that we will not misrepresent our work nor give or receive unauthorized aid. We commit ourselves to behave in a manner which demonstrates concern for the personal dignity, rights and freedoms of all members of the community. We are respectful of Life University property and the property of others. We will not tolerate a lack of respect for these values by anyone.

Nondiscrimination Policy

To view LIFE’s Nondiscrimination Policy visit the General Information  section titled “Policies and Position Statements”.

Rationale

This Honor Code was developed following discussions among a broad range of constituencies within Life University, encompassing students, faculty, staff, administrators and trustees. This Honor Code is a living document that will evolve with time in order to better foster and advance an environment of ethical conduct in its academic community.

Life University may amend both the substantive requirements and the enforcement procedures contained herein to reflect experience gained from its implementation.

Authority

Any modification of the Honor Code must be approved by the Board of Trustees upon recommendation from the President.

The Life University Standards of Conduct govern the enforcement of the Honor Code. Modifications and variations in the Standards of Conduct, including the use of alternative procedures in specific contexts as mandated by federal or state law, are subject to the approval of the President. In addition, upon recommendation from a Dean, Director or the Faculty Senate, the President, Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Vice President of Student Services may permit individual units of Life University to adopt and implement area-specific standards of conduct. However, these standards may not authorize or condone conduct prohibited by, or inconsistent with, the Honor Code.

Any changes to the Standards of Conduct shall be published in the Academic Quarterly and shall be in effect from the day of publication forward.

Definitions

The term “student” includes all persons taking/auditing courses at Life University, either full-time or part-time, pursuing undergraduate, graduate or professional studies. Persons who withdraw after allegedly violating the Standards of Conduct, who are not officially enrolled for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with Life University or who have been notified of their acceptance for admission, are considered “students” as are persons who are living in Life University residence, although not enrolled in this institution.

The term “respondent” refers to any student or student organization or member of a student organization who has been formally charged with alleged violations of the Standards of Conduct.

The term “complainant” refers to any Life University community member who has filed a complaint with the Director of Student Conduct, alleging that one or more violations of the Standards of Conduct have occurred.

The term “Conduct Review Board,” or “CRB” for short, refers to any person or persons authorized by the Director of Student Conduct to determine whether a student has been found to have violated the Standards of Conduct and to recommend sanctions that may be imposed when a rules violation has been committed.

Enforcement

The Life University Standards of Conduct shall apply to all Life University students. The procedures in the Life University Student Handbook shall govern and be followed in the case of any accused of violating the Honor Code. When a member of the Life University community serves in multiple roles, the applicable handbook will be determined by which role the respondent was serving in at the time of the alleged violation. Any conflict or dispute concerning which procedure governs the enforcement of this Honor Code shall be resolved by the Vice President of Student Services.

Jurisdiction

While the activities covered by the legal system of the larger community and those covered by the Life University Standards of Conduct may overlap, it is important to note that the community’s laws and the Life University Standards of Conduct operate independently and that they do not substitute for each other. Life University may pursue enforcement of its own Standards of Conduct whether or not legal proceedings are underway or even being considered and may use information from third party sources (such as law enforcement agencies and the courts) to determine whether the Life University Standards of Conduct have been violated. Life University Standards of Conduct apply to student behavior both on campus and off campus, and enforcement of these Standards may occur regardless of where the behavior took place.

In the case of allegations of sexual misconduct, the Life University Sexual Misconduct Policy and Procedures shall apply and supersedes the procedures and policies set forth in the Honor Code.

Standards of Conduct

Introduction

The Life University Standards of Conduct apply to all members of the LIFE community. Each constituency will be governed by the appropriate handbook, policies or laws. Students are governed by the Student Disciplinary Procedures contained in this document. Faculty members are governed by the Faculty Handbook as Staff members are governed by the Employee Handbook. Members of the Board of Trustees are governed by The Georgia Nonprofit Corporation Code, the Articles of Incorporation, the By-Laws and other policies of the Life University Board of Trustees.

Life University expects its community members to recognize the strength of personal differences while respecting the institutional values embodied in the Honor Code. They are encouraged to think and act for themselves, as that is the purpose of higher education. However, they must also understand that Life University has non-negotiable values in which it strongly believes. The purpose of these Standards of Conduct is to communicate these values to the Life University community and promote an environment conducive to education, work, scholarly activity and recreation.

Civility | Community | Integrity | Responsibility

A. Civility

“In recognizing the humanity of our fellow beings, we pay ourselves the highest tribute.” -Thurgood Marshall

  1. Disorderly Conduct. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act that is lewd, indecent, disruptive or that otherwise breaches the peace, regardless of intent, when such an act takes place on Life University premises or at any event sponsored or offered by Life University.
       
    2. Indulging in conduct during a class or examination session or while in clinic which is so disruptive as to infringe upon the rights of another member of the Life University community.
  2. Harassment. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act, display or communication intended to create a hostile environment or cause substantial emotional injury and/or distress on the part of the person or persons to whom it is specifically directed. This behavior frequently, but not always, involves a pattern of conduct.
       
    2. Any attempt to repeatedly make contact with a person over his/her stated objections when such contact serves no legitimate purpose. This includes, but is not limited to, intentionally following another person on campus or in or about a public place or places.
       
    3. Any unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to make an audio, video or digital record of any person while on Life University premises without his/her prior knowledge, and valid consent, when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in a gym, locker room or restroom. This provision does not preclude Life University from engaging in surveillance for the purposes of providing a safe and secure environment for its students, faculty and staff.
       
    4. Sexual harassment, which is the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment may include, for example, an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual relationship; to repeatedly subject a person to egregious, unwelcome sexual attention or advances; to punish a refusal to comply with a sexual based request; to condition a benefit on submitting to sexual advances; sexual violence or sexual assault; intimate partner violence; stalking; and gender-based bullying. Sexual violence is a form of sexual harassment.
  3. Provocation. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Referring with disrespect to all peers, health professionals and members of the Life University community.
       
    2. Any act, display or communication that may reasonably be expected to cause an immediate breach of the peace by the person or persons to whom it is specifically directed.
       
    3. Any act, display or communication that reasonably may be expected to cause disruption of a Life University event. This includes, but is not limited to, the use of racial epithets or other patently offensive language in a manner that is likely to provoke an immediate breach of the peace.
       
    4. Any display or communication, whether oral or visual, that encourages an audience to take immediate action, when such action may reasonably be expected to inflict harm upon a person or persons and/or cause damage to property.

B. Community

“This City is what it is because our citizens are who they are.” –Plato

  1. Endangerment. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act, display or communication that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his/her personal safety. This includes, but is not limited to, physical coercion and/or restraint.
       
    2. Causing bodily harm to a person or engaging in aggressive physical contact that would likely have caused bodily harm, despite the lack of any measurable harm.
       
    3. Any act that directly or indirectly creates a substantial risk to the safety of a person or persons and/or the Life University community. This includes, but is not limited to, falsely reporting an emergency and/or engaging in the unauthorized possession, use or alteration of any Life University-owned emergency or safety equipment.
  2. Hazing. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Participation in and/or having knowledge of and failing to report any initiation process which requires any member of the Life University community to participate in, or subjects them to, any activity which produces or is likely to produce physical, mental or emotional pain, discomfort, humiliation or embarrassment to that person, regardless of that person’s willingness to participate in such activity in connection with or as a condition or precondition of gaining acceptance, membership, office or other status in a school organization.
  3. Interference. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act that disrupts or interferes with any educational, clinical, administrative or other aspect of Life University’s operations. This provision is not intended to prohibit organized, peaceful and orderly protests.
  4. Non-Compliance. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any failure to comply with a reasonable request of a Life University official in the performance of his/her duties. This includes, but is not limited to, failure to comply with any written or oral instructions communicated as part of the disciplinary process.
       
    2. Any failure to provide one’s Life University identification card upon request to any Life University official.
       
    3. Any failure to abide by signs, placards and/or other official Life University postings.
       
    4. Behavior that has been adjudicated to violate or may violate local, state or federal laws.
  5. Violation of Life University Policies. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any unauthorized entry into, use or occupation of Life University facilities that are locked, closed to student activities or otherwise restricted as to use or that have not been reserved for use through the proper Life University authorities.
       
    2. Any failure to report violations of these Standards of Conduct, which occur in one’s presence and/or in one’s designated living area on Life University premises. Anyone who encourages, instigates or endorses such misconduct through inaction may also be held responsible for violating the appropriate Standards of Conduct.
       
    3. Any failure to take reasonable steps to prevent one’s guest or visitor to Life University from violating these Standards of Conduct. Anyone who allows such misconduct may also be held responsible for violating the appropriate Standards of Conduct.
       
    4. Any act which is in violation of Life University policies not outlined in these Standards of Conduct. These include, but are not limited to, campus housing policies, discrimination policies, parking regulations, intellectual property policies, Student Services policies and policies governing the appropriate use of Life University technology.

C. Integrity

“Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.” -Thomas Jefferson

  1. Academic Misconduct. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Referring to materials or sources or employing devices not authorized by the instructor during an academic or clinical evaluation.
       
    2. Providing to and/or receiving from another person assistance during an academic or clinical evaluation in a manner not authorized by the instructor.
       
    3. Possessing, buying, selling, obtaining and/or using a copy of any materials intended to be used as an instrument of academic evaluation, in advance of its administration, not authorized by the instructor.
       
    4. Possessing, buying, selling, obtaining and/or using a copy of any previous assessment instrument not authorized or released for student availability by the instructor.
       
    5. Utilizing a substitute in any academic evaluation or attendance taking process.
       
    6. Acting as a substitute for another person in any academic evaluation or attendance taking process.
       
    7. Practicing any form of deceit in any academic or clinical evaluation or attendance taking process.
       
    8. Providing aid and/or depending on the aid of others in the research, preparation, creation, writing, performing or publication of work to be submitted for academic credit or evaluation, unless expressly authorized to provide such aid by the instructor.
       
    9. Plagiarism, which includes but is not limited to presenting as one’s own, for academic evaluation, the ideas, representations or words of another person or persons, including internet sources without customary and proper acknowledgment of sources.
       
    10. Submitting the work of another person in a manner that represents the work to be one’s own.
       
    11. Permitting one’s work to be submitted by another person without the instructor’s authorization.
       
    12. Attempting to influence or change one’s academic evaluation or record on any basis other than achievement or merit.
       
    13. Failing to cooperate, if called upon, in the investigation or disposition of any allegation of dishonesty pertaining to another member of the Life University community.
       
    14. Presenting oneself, with the intent to deceive, as having credentials one has not yet earned.
  2. Ethical Misconduct. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Failing to comply with published clinic policies, rules and/or regulations.
       
    2. Misrepresenting oneself or allowing oneself to be incorrectly identified to any member of the public as a Doctor of Chiropractic or other licensed healthcare practitioner.
       
    3. Student interns caring for or attempting to provide care for and/or advising patients, directly or indirectly at any time or place, without the supervision and prior approval of Life University’s licensed clinical faculty or other licensed Doctors of Chiropractic specifically designated by the appropriate Life University official to supervise student intern care.
       
    4. Student interns providing care or attempting to provide care for or services that have not been approved by Life University’s licensed clinical faculty, other licensed Doctors of Chiropractic or other licensed healthcare practitioner, specifically designated by the appropriate Life University official to approve such care or services.
       
    5. Failing to behave in a professional manner when in a professional relationship with any member of the Life University community.
       
    6. Divulging or allowing access to confidential student or patient information, unless required by law (FERPA, HIPAA).
       
    7. Failing to obtain prior written consent of the student or patient and/or failing to adequately de-identify patient information used in writing, reports, classroom lectures or other public forums.
       
    8. Removing student or patient records or radiographs from classrooms, offices or clinic facilities without proper authorization.
       
    9. Failing to use due diligence to accurately note in patient records: all data derived directly from the patient, all clinical assessments of the patient, all changes in the patient’s condition, all recommendations to the patient and all care delivered to and/or performed on the patient.
       
    10. Withdrawing from the care of a patient without prior approval from the clinic doctor of record. All recommendations of referral, care and/or transfer of a patient, for any reason, are privileges reserved for the clinic faculty doctor(s) of record.
       
    11. Subordinating the health and welfare of a patient and/or the quality of patient care to anyone’s expectation of academic, personal or monetary reward or lack thereof.
       
    12. Paying for a patient’s care, and/or inducing and/or attempting to induce members of the public, patients or members of a patient’s family to submit to health care in exchange for monetary compensation or anything else of value.
       
    13. Transporting anyone (other than the one’s own immediate family members) to and/or from Life University premises for the purpose of patient evaluation or care.
       
    14. Advertising healthcare services other than as specifically defined as allowable by the state, Life University and/or clinic regulations.
       
    15. Engaging solicitors or agents for the purpose of soliciting patients, or becoming involved in such endeavors.
       
    16. Failing to suspend, terminate or limit the scope of involvement with a subordinate (patient, student, etc.) when personal problems or conflicts, or a personal relationship with the subordinate, interferes with or may interfere with the professional relationship.
  3. Dishonesty. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any conscious and/or deliberate provision of false or misleading information to a Life University official in the performance of his/her duties.
       
    2. Any conscious and/or deliberate presentation of false or misleading testimony during a disciplinary hearing.
       
    3. Any forgery, misuse, misrepresentation and/or unauthorized alteration of any Life University or other official documents, records or credentials. This includes, but is not limited to, the inclusion of false information on any official form or document submitted to Life University.
       
    4. Any possession or use of forged or falsified identification. This includes, but is not limited to, use of another person’s identification and/or the possession of “novelty” identification that misrepresents one’s age or identity.
  4. Theft. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any appropriation or possession of property (including intellectual property such as current or old tests, instructor’s notes, etc.) by a member of the Life University community without the consent of the owner or person legally responsible for such property. This includes, but is not limited to, the possession of property a member of the Life University community should reasonably be expected to know is stolen property.
       
    2. Any appropriation of items provided without charge when such appropriation exceeds reasonable limits and/or restrictions imposed by the owner or person legally responsible for such materials.
       
    3. Any unauthorized utilization of labor and/or services provided by Life University.

D. Responsibility

“All your scholarship, all your study of Shakespeare and Wordsworth would be vain if at the same time you do not build your character and attain mastery over your thoughts and actions.” -Mohandas Gandhi

  1. Alcohol Misuse. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any possession or use of alcohol by any person under the age of 21, or any possession or use of alcohol by any person in violation of the relevant Life University policies.
       
    2. Any presence on campus while under the influence of alcohol.
       
    3. Any unauthorized manufacture or distribution of alcohol while on Life University premises or at any Life University-sponsored event, or any distribution of alcohol to any person under the age of 21.
       
    4. Any act which causes a person to ingest alcohol without his/her knowing and valid consent.
       
    5. Any possession on Life University premises of any item designed, fashioned and/or modified to facilitate and/or disguise the use of alcohol in violation of the Standards of Conduct, whether or not the item has actually been used for such purposes.
  2. Drug Misuse. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any possession or use of any illegal drug or other controlled substance, or any possession or use of any prescription drug or other controlled substance except as directed by a licensed physician.
       
    2. Any presence on campus while under the influence of any illegal substance.
       
    3. Any manufacture and/or distribution or intent to distribute any illegal drug, or any manufacture and/or distribution of any prescription drug or other controlled substance without a license for such conduct.
       
    4. Any act which causes a person to ingest any illegal or prescription drug or other controlled substance without his/her knowing and valid consent.
       
    5. Any possession on Life University premises of any item designed, fashioned and/or modified to facilitate and/or disguise the use of any illegal drug or other controlled substance in violation of the Standards of Conduct, whether or not the item has actually been used for such purposes.
  3. Physical Misconduct. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act causing, or intended or likely to cause, bodily harm upon and/or unwanted physical contact with any person, regardless of intent.
  4. Property Damage. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Any act causing, or intended or likely to cause, damage to property, without the knowing and valid consent of the owner or person legally responsible for such property, regardless of intent.
       
    2. Any intentional destruction, defacement and/or unauthorized alteration of approved materials posted or distributed in accordance with Life University policies. This includes, but is not limited to, bulletin boards or the materials posted on them.
  5. Sexual Misconduct. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. Non-Consensual Sexual Contact: Non-Consensual Sexual Contact is any intentional sexual touching by a person upon a person that is without consent and/or by force. Sexual Contact includes, but is not limited to, intentional contact with the breasts, buttocks, groin or genitals, or touching another with any of these body parts, or making another touch you or themselves with or on any of these body parts; any intentional bodily contact in a sexual manner, though not involving contact with/of/by breasts, buttocks, groin, genitals, mouth or other orifice, with any object.
       
    2. Sexual Exploitation: Occurs when a student takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute one of other sexual misconduct offenses. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:
      • Invasion of sexual privacy;
         
      • Prostituting another student;
         
      • Non-consensual video or audio-taping of sexual activity;
         
      • Going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting your friends hide in the closet to watch you having consensual sex);
         
      • Engaging in voyeurism;
         
      • Any act that is sexual in nature when such an act is likely to threaten any party’s health and/or safety without his/her knowing and valid consent. This includes, but is not limited to, any act that may reasonably be expected to transmit HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases and is performed when either party has failed to divulge his/her infection with such a disease;
         
      • Exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances; inducing another to expose their genitals;
         
      • Sexually-based stalking and/or bullying may also be forms of sexual exploitation.

Consent is defined as agreement that is informed and given freely. Previous relationships or instances of consent do not imply future consent. By definition, there is no consent when there is a threat of force or violence or any other form of coercion or intimidation, physical or psychological. Impairment due to the use of alcohol or drugs does not excuse failure to obtain consent. Likewise, any person incapacitated by alcohol or drug use, or who is unconscious, asleep or physically impaired is incapable of giving consent. Whether a person has taken advantage of a position of influence over another person may be a factor in determining consent.

Life University recognizes that students may be reluctant to report sexual misconduct because they themselves or witnesses they identify may have been in violation of other provisions of the Honor Code and Standards of Conduct (i.e., alcohol or drugs). In order to encourage reports of sexual misconduct, Life University may choose not pursue a disciplinary action for an alcohol or drug violation against the Complainant or any Student(s) who may have witnessed the incident as long as the investigation and subsequent conduct process do not reveal that witnesses involved played a role, however minor, in the sexual misconduct itself.

  1. Weapons. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to:
    1. The unauthorized carrying or possession of any type of weapon, firearm, ammunition, explosive or illegal knife (any dirk, bowie knife, switchblade knife, ballistic knife, any other knife having a blade of two or more inches, straight-edge razor, razor blade with the exception of kitchen knives inside University residence halls) on the premises of Life University is strictly prohibited. This prohibition expressly includes those persons licensed to carry concealed firearms. In addition, and for the safety of those in the University community, other prohibited items include, but are not limited to, paintball guns, projectile launchers including Air Soft@, BB guns/pistols, facsimiles of a weapon and fireworks. The possession of non-lethal self-defense instruments (such as Mace) is not prohibited; however, the reckless or inappropriate use of such devices may be considered a violation of the Honor Code.

      For purposes of this policy, the premises of Life University are defined as any property, building or portion of a building or property that LIFE owns or occupies, whether on a temporary or permanent basis, and any off-site premises where LIFE is conducting any activity sponsored by the University. This includes all parking lots, parking areas, sidewalks, walkways and all University vehicles and equipment.
       
    2. As any object has the potential to become a weapon, Life University reserves the right to define a weapon based on its potential for damage or threat.

Student Disciplinary Procedures

Introduction

Life University recognizes the importance of protecting the rights of students who have been charged with, but not yet found responsible for, violation(s) of the Life University Standards of Conduct. Balanced against this responsibility is the right of students, faculty and employees of Life University to continue their educational, academic and professional endeavors free from the threat of harassment, abuse, retribution and/or violence.

Student Disciplinary Policies and Procedures

All members of the Life University Community are entrusted with the responsibility of upholding ethical goals and values. Essential to the fundamental purpose of Life University is a personal commitment to the principles of citizenship and integrity. Life University maintains an Honor Code and Standards of Conduct as well as a set of Disciplinary Procedures that are designed to hold students responsible for their actions as well as protect their rights.

Interim Suspension

In certain circumstances, a Life University official may impose a suspension prior. During an interim suspension, a student or student organization is denied access to Life University property, activities and/or privileges in order to prevent the disruption of, or interference with, the normal operations of Life University, and to comply with legal requirements.

Life University may take whatever measures it deems necessary in order to protect the safety, security and/or integrity of a complainant, a respondent, Life University and/or any member(s) of its community. Such measures include, but are not limited to: involuntary removal from a course, clinic, program, activity and/or the campus pending a hearing; modifications to living arrangements in Life University properties; and/or reporting incidents to law enforcement or other non-Life University agencies. The Director of Student Conduct, in consultation with the appropriate faculty and/or other administrators, shall be empowered to impose any appropriate interim measures.

Informal Resolution:

The Director of Student Conduct may hold informal discussions, resolve all types of complaints and impose sanctions with the consent of all parties involved. This process may involve the Division Chairs, Department Heads, Deans or other Life University officials to facilitate an Informal Resolution.

  1. An informal hearing is only available when the Respondent, the Complainant and the Director of Student Conduct mutually agree to resolve the charges in an informal setting, and waive their right to a formal hearing and right to appeal. The Director of Student Conduct reserves the right to conduct fact-finding to make an informed decision. When there are charges of sexual assault or violence, the policies and procedures in the Life University Sexual Misconduct Policy and Procedures shall apply.
     
  2. If a Respondent chooses to resolve a case through Informal Resolution, he/she must indicate this in writing on a form provided by the Director of Student Conduct during an informational meeting.
     
  3. The following apply to an informal hearing:
    1. The meeting(s) will not be recorded.
       
    2. The written decision will serve as the official record of informal hearings.
       
    3. The written decision will be sent to the Charged Student within two business days from the conclusion of the Informal Resolution.
       
    4. Once an Informal Resolution has been agreed upon, the Respondent forfeits his/her right to appeal.

Formal Resolution

The Director of Student Conduct is further empowered to initiate formal hearings as necessary for all types of complaints, except for complaints of sexual misconduct. In the case of allegations of sexual misconduct, the Life University Sexual Misconduct Policy and Procedures shall apply and supersedes the procedures and policies set forth in the Honor Code. These hearings will be held by either an Administrative Hearing Officer or the Conduct Review Board (CRB).

Authority | Composition | Eligibility | Hearing Procedures | Sanctions

A. Authority

The Administrative Hearing Officer and Conduct Review Board (CRB) have the authority to conduct hearings to determine if an accused member of the Life University student community is in violation of the Standards of Conduct, and to impose sanctions, as appropriate, up to and including expulsion from Life University.

B. Composition

The Administrative Hearing Officer is a faculty or staff member designated by the Director of Student Conduct and must meet the CRB eligibility requirements as stated below.

The CRB shall be composed of three (3) voting members, selected by the Director of Student Conduct from a pool of qualified individuals, and one non-voting Chairperson. One (1) voting member shall be a staff member and one (1) voting member shall be a faculty member. The Director of Student Conduct shall designate the Chairperson, excluding him or herself.

In the event that the Complainant and/or the Respondent fail(s) to appear as scheduled, the Chair of the CRB may choose to conduct or reschedule the hearing.

If the CRB involves more than one Respondent, the Director of Student Conduct, in his or her discretion, may permit the CRB concerning each student to be conducted either separately or jointly.

C. Eligibility

In order to be eligible to serve on the CRB, individuals must meet the following requirements:

  1. Faculty must have been employed by Life University for a minimum of one (1) academic year and have taught at least one course within the most recent two (2) academic quarters.
     
  2. Staff must be currently employed and must have been employed by Life University for at least one (1) complete quarter.

The Title IX Coordinator shall be responsible for recruiting, selecting and training members of the CRB. It is expected that members of the CRB shall recuse themselves from a particular hearing if there is the likelihood that their objectivity may be compromised.

D. Hearing Procedures
  1. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall have all participants execute confidentiality agreements.
     
  2. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall call the hearing to order and state the date and time.
     
  3. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall ask for identification of the parties attending the hearing for the record.
     
  4. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall state the conditions of the hearing, including:
    • The hearing shall be recorded and/or transcribed via court reporter.
       
    • The hearing shall be closed, with participation limited to the Respondent(s), the Complainant(s) and any advisor(s) and/ or witness(es). Witnesses will remain outside the hearing until asked to provide information.
       
    • All statements, testimony and evidence shall be restricted to matters directly relevant to the case, as determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair will not be obligated to follow the rules of evidence as applied in a court of law.
       
    • Any person disrupting, interfering with or failing to abide by the rulings of the Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair may be excused from the hearing.
       
    • Advisors, if present, shall be restricted to consulting with their advisees. Advisors may not address witnesses, the Administrative Hearing Officer or members of the CRB unless invited to do so.
       
    • Deliberations will not be recorded. The level of proof required to determine whether or not a Respondent is responsible for the allegations shall be “by a preponderance of the evidence.”
       
    • The hearing and its final outcome shall be considered part of the Respondent’s educational record, and as such shall be kept confidential, except as provided under federal and state law.
  5. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall ask the Complainant(s) and the Respondent(s) at this time if there are any objections to proceeding with the hearing. He/she shall be solely responsible for deciding if such objections are reasonable and/or what measures should be taken to address them.
     
  6. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall present the complaint and state the charge(s).
     
  7. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall read any response submitted by the Respondent(s).
     
  8. The Complainant(s) shall be given the opportunity to make an opening statement.
     
  9. The Respondent(s) shall be given the opportunity to make an opening statement.
     
  10. The Complainant(s) shall be given the opportunity to present evidence and/or call witnesses. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB shall have the first option of questioning the Complainant(s) and/or witness(es), followed by the Respondent(s).
     
  11. The Respondent(s) shall be given the opportunity to present evidence and/or call witnesses. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB shall have the first option of questioning the Respondent(s) and/or witness(es), followed by the Complainant(s).
     
  12. The Complainant(s) shall be given the opportunity to make a closing statement. Parties are not allowed to cross-examine.
     
  13. The Respondent(s) shall be given the opportunity to make a closing statement.
     
  14. The Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair shall conclude the hearing.
     
  15. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB shall enter closed deliberations. All findings of fact and any determination(s) of violation(s) shall be decided by a majority vote, based on a preponderance of the evidence.
     
  16. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB shall determine if the Respondent(s) are in violation of the Standards of Conduct. In a CRB hearing, determination of responsibility is decided by a majority vote.
     
  17. If the Respondent is found to be in violation, appropriate sanctions will be assigned. Title IX Coordinator will inform the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB of the Respondent’s prior conduct history and shall make sanction recommendations for the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB to consider. They have five (5) business days to submit their findings.
E. Sanctions

The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB shall select at least one of the following sanctions to impose upon a respondent found in violation the Standards of Conduct:

  1. Disciplinary Reprimand: the Respondent receives a written statement that he/she has violated the Standards of Conduct and that further similar violations will result in stronger sanctions.
     
  2. Disciplinary Probation: the Respondent receives a written statement that he/she has violated the Standards of Conduct and that further similar violations may result in suspension or expulsion. The length of the probationary period is determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB.
     
  3. Disciplinary Suspension: the Respondent is informed that he/she is separated (for a minimum of one [1] academic quarter) from Life University property and participation in any Life University activities. This sanction is recorded on the Respondent’s academic transcript during the period of suspension. A Respondent that is suspended from the University is not eligible for tuition and/or registration fee reimbursement except as provided by University Policies. The Respondent will be administratively withdrawn from courses and will lose respective credit hours.
     
  4. Disciplinary Expulsion: the Respondent is informed that he/she is permanently separated from Life University property and participation in any/all Life University activities with no possibility of readmission. This sanction is permanently recorded on the Respondent’s academic transcript. A Respondent who is expelled from the University is not eligible for tuition and/or registration fee reimbursement except as provided by University Policies. The Respondent will be administratively withdrawn from courses and will lose respective credit hours.
     
  5. Additional Sanctions: During the resolution process, other educational sanctions, restitutions and/or restrictions may be imposed, including, but not limited to:
    • Discretionary Sanctions: Denial of academic credit, exclusion from privileged or extracurricular activities, essays or research papers, online education courses, work and/or community service assignments.
       
    • Clinic Suspension: Separation of the Respondent from the clinic for a definite period of time, determined by the CRB.
       
    • Exclusion from University Housing.
       
    • Psychological Evaluation – referral for an evaluation and recommendation by a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist.

The Respondent must provide evidence of compliance with any recommendations made by the psychologist or psychiatrist. The Respondent must provide any and all necessary releases so that the licensed professional may provide official documentation, on letterhead, verifying attendance and compliance with the recommendations made by the professional with the Director of Student Conduct.

Rights and Responsibilities of Participants

A. Respondents

Throughout his/her involvement in the disciplinary process, a Respondent has the following rights and responsibilities:

  1. Fair Treatment
    • The Respondent has the right to be treated with dignity and respect by all persons involved in the disciplinary process.
       
    • The Respondent has the right to be considered not responsible for all charges until he/she admits or is determined by the Administrative Hearing Officer or Conduct Review Board (CRB) to be in violation of the Standards of Conduct. This right should not be construed to prevent Life University from taking necessary interim measures.
       
    • The Respondent has the right to information regarding the disciplinary process and his/her role in that process. In addition, the Respondent has the right to access all records contained in his/her conduct file upon request.
       
    • The Respondent has the right to object to and/or request that any one member of the CRB recuse themselves from a hearing. This request will be reviewed and a decision made by the Director of Student Conduct. The request must be submitted to the Director of Student Conduct at least 72 hours prior to the hearing.
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to notify the Director of Student Conduct, or the Vice President of Student Services, if and when he/she feels that he/she has not received fair and equitable treatment.
  2. Privacy
    • The Respondent has the right to privacy throughout the disciplinary process with respect to all uninvolved parties in accordance with all applicable privacy laws, including but not limited to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
       
    • The Respondent has the right to be free from intimidation and/or harassment, and the right, upon request, to have reasonable measures taken by Life University to prevent unnecessary or unwanted contact with the Complainant(s).
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to notify the Director of Student Conduct, or the Vice President of Student Services, if and when he/she feels reasonable measures need to be taken in order to protect these rights.
  3. Presence of an Advisor
    • The Respondent has the right to confer with an advisor of his/her choice (excluding those persons directly involved in the dispute) throughout the disciplinary process. The advisor may be present, but may not actively participate in the hearing, and may not serve as a witness. Should the advisor be an attorney, the Respondent must notify the Director of Student Conduct at least 72 hours prior to any scheduled hearing. The Director of Student Conduct will make any necessary notifications.
       
    • Advisors, if present, shall be restricted to consulting with their advisees. Advisors may not address witnesses, the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB unless invited to do so.
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to notify the advisor of the time, date and location of any disciplinary proceeding. Proceedings will not be rescheduled to accommodate an advisor.
  4. Notice
    • The Respondent has the right to timely and proper notification (via e-mail, telephone or personal contact) of any interview to be conducted with him/her as part of an inquiry. This notice shall include the following:
      1. The time, date and location of the interview;
         
      2. The consequences of failure to appear at the interview;
         
      3. The procedures for requesting a change in the time and/or date of the interview.
    • The Respondent has the right to proper written notification of any hearing conducted as a result of a complaint filed against him/her. This notice shall be provided no less than 72 hours prior to the scheduled hearing, and shall include the following:
      1. The time, date and location of the hearing;
         
      2. The consequences of failure to appear at the hearing;
         
      3. A written copy of the complaint, including the name(s) of the reporting party/parties and the charges being considered;
         
      4. A list of all Complainants and/or anticipated witnesses to be called by the Complainant and/or Life University, except when disclosure would cause undue risk to the witness(es);
         
      5. The name of the Administrative Hearing Officer or a list of the members of the CRB. This information is provided to the Respondent with the clear understanding that he/she is not to contact the Administrative Hearing Officer or any members of the CRB prior to the hearing;
         
      6. The procedures for requesting a change in the time and/or date of the hearing.
  5. Hear and Provide Testimony
    • The Respondent has the right to hear, question and respond to all witnesses and/or information presented during a hearing. This does not include the right to directly question the Complainant and/or the Complainant’s witnesses, although permission to do so may be granted by the Administrative Hearing Officer or the Chair of the CRB.
       
    • The Respondent has the right not to present evidence against him/herself. This includes the Respondent’s right not to answer questions. Refusal to present evidence or answer questions should not be interpreted as an admission of responsibility. This right should not be construed to allow the Respondent to consciously and/or deliberately present false or misleading testimony.
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to attend any hearing conducted as the result of a complaint against him/her.
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to respond to any witnesses or information at the time such evidence is presented. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB is not required to consider any rebuttal made after a witness has been dismissed.
       
    • The Respondent has the responsibility to inform any witnesses he/she wishes to call of the time, date and location of the hearing and to have on hand all evidence he/she wishes to present at the time of the hearing.
  6. Written Disposition and Appeal

The Respondent has the right to proper written notification (within two business days of the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB’s decision) of the results of his/her disciplinary hearing. This notice shall include the following:

  1. The finding(s) of fact on each charge;
     
  2. The sanction(s) imposed; and
     
  3. The procedure for filing an appeal.
  • The Respondent has the right to appeal the outcome of the hearing unless this right has been waived or forfeited as allowed for elsewhere in these procedures.
     
  • The Respondent has the responsibility to comply with all sanctions imposed as the result of a disciplinary hearing. Once an appeal is requested, the sanctions will be stayed and will not take effect until the appeal process has been completed. If no appeal is requested, the sanctions will take effect immediately. In a case in which interim sanctions have been imposed, they will continue in force until all appeals have been exhausted.

B. Complainants

Throughout his/her involvement in the disciplinary process, a Complainant has the following rights and responsibilities:

  1. Fair Treatment
    • The Complainant has the right to be treated with dignity and respect by all persons involved in the disciplinary process.
       
    • The Complainant has the right to information regarding the disciplinary process and his/her role within that process.
       
    • The Complainant has the right to object to and/or request that any one member of the CRB recuse themselves.
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to notify the Director of Student Conduct, or the Vice President of Student Services, if and when he/she feels that he/she has not received fair and equitable treatment.
  2. Privacy
    • The Complainant has the right to privacy throughout the disciplinary process with respect to all uninvolved parties in accordance with all applicable privacy laws, including but not limited to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
       
    • The Complainant has the right to be free from intimidation and/or harassment, and the right, upon request, to have reasonable measures taken by Life University to prevent unnecessary or unwanted contact with the Respondent(s).
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to notify the Director of Student Conduct, or the Executive Director of Student Services, if and when he/she feels reasonable measures need to be taken in order to protect these rights.
  3. Presence of an Advisor
    • The Complainant has the right to confer with an advisor of his/her choice (excluding those persons directly involved in the dispute) throughout the disciplinary process. The advisor may be present but may not actively participate in the Administrative or CRB hearing and may not serve as a witness. Should the advisor be an attorney, the Complainant must notify the Director of Student Conduct at least 72 hours prior to any scheduled hearing. The Director of Student Conduct will make any necessary notifications.

      The Complainant has the responsibility to notify the advisor of the time, date and location of any disciplinary proceeding. Proceedings will not be rescheduled to accommodate an advisor.
  4. Notice
    • The Complainant has the right to proper notification (via e-mail, telephone or personal contact) of any interview to be conducted with him/her as part of an inquiry. This notice shall include the following:
      1. The time, date and location of the interview;
         
      2. The consequences of failure to appear at the interview;
         
      3. The procedures for requesting a change in the time and/or date of the interview.
    • The Complainant has the right to proper written notification of any hearing conducted as a result of a complaint filed by him/her. This notice shall be provided no less than 72 hours prior to the scheduled hearing, and include the following:
      1. The time, date and location of the hearing;
         
      2. The consequences of failure to appear at the hearing;
         
      3. A copy of any written response made by the Respondent;
         
      4. A list of all Respondents and/or anticipated witnesses to be called by the Respondent(s) and/or Life University; except when disclosure would cause undue risk to the witness(es);
         
      5. The name of the Administrative Hearing Officer or a list of the members of the CRB;
         
      6. The procedures for requesting a change in the time or date of the hearing.
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to ensure that Life University has been provided with accurate address and other contact information so that notification is not unduly delayed.
  5. Hear and Provide Testimony
    • The Complainant has the right to hear, question and respond to all witnesses and/or information presented during a hearing. This does not include the right to directly question the Respondent and/or the Respondent’s witnesses, although permission to do so may be granted by the Chair of the CRB.
       
    • The Complainant has the right to present information and/or witnesses that he/she feels are relevant to the complaint. In the interest of time, the Administrative Hearing Officer or Chair of the CRB may limit the number of witnesses called. Only witnesses who can testify as to material facts may be called; the Complainant may not call witnesses who can only testify as to his/her character or the Respondent’s character.
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility not to consciously and/or deliberately present false or misleading testimony.
       
    • The Complainant has the right to provide a written impact statement to the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB, to be considered during the sanctioning process should a finding of “responsible” occur.
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to attend any hearing conducted as the result of a complaint filed by him/her.
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to respond to any witnesses or information at the time such evidence is presented. The Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB is not required to consider any rebuttal made after a witness has been dismissed.
       
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to inform any witnesses he/she wishes to call of the time, date and location of the hearing and to have on hand all evidence he/she wishes to present at the time of the hearing.
  6. Written Disposition and Appeal
    • In cases of sexual and/or violent behavior by the respondent, the Complainant has the right to proper written notification (within two business days of the Hearing or CRB decision) of the outcome of any disciplinary hearing convened as a result of a complaint filed by him/her. This notice shall include the following:
      1. The finding(s) of fact on each charge;
         
      2. The sanctions assigned, if applicable;
         
      3. The procedure for filing an appeal in such cases.
    • The Complainant has the responsibility to maintain the confidentiality of the respondent’s disciplinary records. Failure to do so may be considered a violation of Life University’s Standards of Conduct and/or federal law.

C. Parental Notification

Life University considers disciplinary records to be part of a student’s educational record, and as such, Life University complies with all applicable privacy laws, including but not limited to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Furthermore, Life University’s primary relationship is with its students and not with their parents or guardians.

However, Life University recognizes that parents and/or guardians maintain an interest in their dependant students’ academic status. Therefore, Life University may, at the sole discretion of the Title IX Coordinator, notify the parents or guardians of any dependant student under the age of 18 (21 in cases of alcohol and/or drug violations) who is found responsible for a violation of the Standards of Conduct.

D. Appeals

All Respondents have the right to appeal any decision made by the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB. Complainants in cases involving sexual misconduct or acts of violence have the right to appeal any decision made by the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB. Neither Respondent nor Complainant can appeal an Informal Resolution.

An appeal must be submitted in writing and must be received by the Title IX Coordinator within five (5) business days of the date of notification of the CRB’s decision. An extension to this deadline may be granted at the sole discretion of the Title IX Coordinator. Title IX Coordinator shall then refer the appeal to the appellate officer.

A decision on an appeal may not be rendered until the filing deadline has passed. Appellate decisions should be rendered, and proper written notification provided to the Title IX Coordinator no later than five (5) business days after the filing deadline. The Title IX Coordinator shall notify all Respondents and other parties as appropriate of the results of the appeal.

  1. Appellate Officer. The appellate officer shall be the Executive Vice President or his/her designate.
     
  2. Appeal Criteria. Appeals shall be considered only in the following circumstances:
    • The existence of procedural errors so substantial that the Respondent was denied a fair hearing;
       
    • A finding of fact by the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB clearly not supported by the evidence;
       
    • The imposition of a sanction that is disproportionate, arbitrary and/or capricious.
  3. Available Actions. The appellate officer is limited to taking one o the following actions for each Respondent:
    • Affirm the finding(s) of fact and sanctions imposed by the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB.
       
    • Affirm the finding(s) of fact but modify the sanction(s) imposed.
       
    • Remand the complaint for a new hearing before a new hearing.

Under no circumstances shall the appellate officer supplant the function of the Administrative Hearing Officer or CRB; the appellate process exists solely to review the procedures used in disciplinary proceedings and not to re-hear a complaint in its entirety.

The decision of the appellate officer is final.

E. Records

Documentation of all Student Conduct matters, including individual student cases and student organization cases, will be maintained by the Director of Student Conduct.

The release of Student Conduct records will be governed by applicable federal and state laws regarding the privacy of education records.

The Director of Student Conduct may place a hold on the account of any student who has a pending Student Conduct matter, including any outstanding sanctions

Other than disciplinary expulsion, disciplinary sanctions shall not be made part of the student’s permanent academic record but shall become part of the student’s disciplinary record. Upon graduation, the student’s disciplinary record may be expunged of disciplinary actions upon application to the Director of Student Conduct. Cases involving the imposition of sanctions other than disciplinary suspension or expulsion shall be automatically expunged from the student’s confidential record seven (7) years after final disposition of the case.

All the necessary forms regarding the Honor Code may be found online at www.LIFE.edu/Integrity/ or obtained in the Office of Student Services.

Disciplinary Records

Written Records - The written records of all disciplinary actions, including academic misconduct sanctions, shall be kept in the student’s official file that is maintained by the Director of Student Conduct in the Office of Student Services. These confidential records cannot be removed through any method and may be accessed only by written request of the student, by campus officials who have a legitimate educational interest in accordance with FERPA or through a court order.

Notations of “Disciplinary Suspension” and “Disciplinary Expulsion” are entered on a student’s academic transcript as well as in his/her official file. The notation of a “Disciplinary Suspension” shall remain on the transcript unless the student successfully petitions the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs to have the notation removed. Such petitions must be presented in writing to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs with the former student’s original signature. Generally, consideration for removal will not be granted in less than a one-year period following the end of the suspension. A student-initiated leave of absence or a withdrawal during the period of Disciplinary Suspension shall not be a basis for the early removal of this notation. The notation of “Disciplinary Expulsion” shall not be removed from a student’s transcript except upon the order of the President.

Electronic Records - Electronic records of academic misconduct will also become part of the campus judicial record. This judicial record is maintained by the Director of Student Conduct in the Office of Student Services.

Court Reporter Transcripts / Tape Recordings – Conduct Review Board Hearings shall be recorded via court reporter or tape recording. All tape recordings and hearing transcripts of Conduct Review Board Hearings shall be maintained in the student’s official file with the Director of Student Conduct in the Office of Student Services.

Student Complaint Procedures

Title IX

The mission of Life University is to empower each student with the education, skill and values needed for career success and life fulfillment based on a vitalistic philosophy. The University’s Undergraduate, Graduate and Professional programs—each one committed to excellence in teaching, learning, research and the overall student experience—offer a vision and the promise for a meaningful life, the proficiencies necessary to achieve optimum personal performance and the wisdom to become transformational leaders in an increasingly diverse, global and dynamic world. This commitment includes providing an educational employment and business environment free of sexual harassment.

Sexual harassment of students is illegal. A federal law, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX), prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, including sexual harassment, in education programs and activities. All public and private education institutions that receive any federal funds must comply with Title IX. Title IX protects students from harassment connected to any of the academic, education, extracurricular, athletic and other programs or activities of schools, regardless of the location. Title IX protects both male and female students from sexual harassment by any school employee, another student or a non-employee third party.

Any student with a complaint of discriminatory harassment should contact the Director of Student Conduct or the Title IX Coordinator in the Human Resources Department to make a complaint or obtain information about the procedure for handling such complaints.

Non-Academic Matters

Students with grievances relating to non-academic matters should confer with the Director of Student Conduct. The Director of Student Conduct will facilitate a review of the issue as it relates to Life University policy. The role of the Director of Student Conduct is to facilitate a resolution to each issue presented as well as ensure that each individual is treated fairly and in accordance with all Life University policies, procedures and standards of conduct. If a resolution cannot be achieved, the Director of Student Conduct may refer the student to the Human Resources Department to determine what additional steps may be available.

Academic Matters

Concerning academic questions or complaints, the student should first go to the instructor involved. If questions are not satisfactorily handled or the complaint adequately handled, the student should go to the instructor’s immediate supervisor (the assistant dean/division chair). The next step in the student complaint process is for the student to go to the associate dean of the college in which the student is enrolled, and then to the dean of the appropriate college if needs are not satisfactorily met through the associate dean. If students wish to appeal the decision of the dean, they should contact the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make the final decision.

Procedures for Institutional Sanctions

The rules and procedures for all offenses and disciplinary proceedings are defined in the Student Handbook. It is important to note that both the victim and the accused are afforded certain rights and that the list of references for counseling or any other assistance is available to both.

In cases of domestic violence and sexual offenses, Life University will make reasonable accommodations with regard to class schedules or living arrangements.

Computer Use Policy

Primary Principles

Freedom of expression, personal responsibility and an open environment to pursue scholarly inquiry and the sharing of information are encouraged, supported and protected at Life University. These values lie at the core of the academic community.

Concomitant with free expression are the personal obligations of each member of our community to use computer resources responsibly, ethically and in a manner that accords to both the law and the rights of others. The campus depends first upon a spirit of mutual respect and an open community of responsible users.

Guidelines

These guidelines set forth standards for responsible and acceptable use of Life University computer resources. They supplement existing Life University policies, agreements, state, federal laws and regulations. Computer resources include host systems, Life University-sponsored computers, workstations and devices, web-hosted information, communication networks, software and files.

Computing resources are provided to support the academic research, instructional and administrative objectives of the University. These resources are extended for the sole use of University faculty, staff and students, and other authorized users to accomplish tasks related to the user’s status at Life University and consistent with Life University’s mission.

Users are responsible for safeguarding their identification (ID) codes (Logins and Passwords) and for using them for their intended purposes only. Each user is responsible for all transactions made under the authorization of his or her (Logins and Passwords) and for all network activity originating from his or her data jack or computer at the time and date used.  Students should never share their student ID, usernames or passwords with others. Students are also advised to use a unique password for university systems and not to use the same passwords they use for personal, financial or social websites and services.

Violation of these guidelines constitutes unacceptable use of computer resources and may violate other University policies and/or state and federal law. Suspected or known violations should be reported to the appropriate Life University computing unit. Violation may result in revocation of computer resource privileges and student disciplinary action or legal action.

User Responsibilities

The following provisions describe conduct prohibited under these guidelines:

  1. Altering system software or hardware configurations or disrupting or interfering with the delivery or administration of computer resources.
     
  2. Attempting to access or accessing another’s account, private files or email without the owner’s permission; or misrepresenting oneself as another individual in electronic communication.
     
  3. Installing, copying, distributing or using software in violation of: copyright and/or software agreements, applicable state and federal laws or the principle described in Using Software. Guides to ethical and legal use of software for members of the Academic Community are available on the Life University Library website under Library 101-Section 1, Copyright Education.
     
  4. Using computer resources to engage in conduct which interferes with other’s use of shared computer resources and/or the activities of other users, including studying, teaching, research and University administration.
     
  5. Using computer resources for commercial or profit-making purposes without written authorization from the University.
     
  6. Failing to adhere to individual department or unit lab and system policies, procedures and protocols. Allowing access to computer resources by unauthorized users.
     
  7. Using computer resources for illegal activities. Criminal and illegal use may include obscenity, child pornography, threats, harassment, theft and unauthorized access.
     
  8. LIFE students’ network access accounts are provided primarily for official communications from the University and are not provided for private or personal use. Incidental personal use is permitted, as long as those uses do not violate the law; restrictions that derive from the LIFE’s tax-exempt status; LIFE’s policies, ordinances, rules and guidelines; and contracts that LIFE has made.
     
  9. LIFE students’ network access accounts may not be used for commercial or profit-making purposes unrelated to Life University business. Students must not use their LIFE student email accounts for any commercial use for personal profit, including publishing their own or other students’ email addresses for commercial activity contacts. Users must not use their LIFE student email accounts for any commercial use, unless authorized in writing by LIFE administrative officials. Violation of these rules can result in termination of the student’s LIFE network access accounts.
     
  10. The LIFE Directory is provided as a service to the faculty, staff and students of Life University. The email addresses contained in the LIFE Directory are not intended for general public communication, for private use or for personal use. The email addresses contained in this Directory may not be used for commercial or profit-making purposes unrelated to University business. Anyone who obtains email addresses from this Directory must not send bulk email or emails to more than ten (10) recipients in this Directory unless each addressee has given written consent to be included on the list or the sender has received written authorization from LIFE administrative personnel.

Administration

The maintenance, operation and security of computer resources require responsible Life University personnel to monitor and access the system. To the extent possible in the electronic environment and a public setting, a user’s privacy will be preserved. Nevertheless, that privacy is subject to the other applicable state and federal laws and the needs of the University to meet its administrative, business and legal obligations.